ANN Get-together 2018 Circular No1

 

ANN logo 96 KB ver

South East Australian Naturalists' Association Inc
No A0044963D ABN 23 918 778 150
Australian Naturalists' Network 2018 Get-together
No A0014919P ABN 13 150 403 135

 

Circular No1: Expression of Interest     June 2017

The 10th Get-together of Australian Naturalists’ Network is being organised by the South East Australian Naturalists’ Association Inc.

It will be begin at Halls Gap in the Grampians on Saturday 29 September 2018 and conclude on Monday 8 October 2018 at Anglesea on the Surf Coast near Geelong. This is the middle of the spring season in southern Victoria when many local communities hold native flower shows.

To assist with planning and information regarding travel and accommodation we are seeking expression of interests from those likely to be attending. This will enable us to continue with our planning and budgetting. This circular and any updates will be available on the ANN website This circular is being emailed to field naturalists who have supplied email addresses for previous Get-togethers and all Clubs affiliated with ANN.

Please notify John Gregurke jgregurke1@bigpond.com if you do not wish to receive future emails or correct email address.

Proposed program:

Date Activity Accommodation
Sat 29 Sep Travel Tullamarine to Halls Gap for registation and dinner Norval, Halls Gap
Sun 30 Sep Southern Grampians Norval, Halls Gap
Mon 1 Oct Northern Grampians Norval, Halls Gap
Tue 2 Oct Lake Fyans, Pomonal Norval, Halls Gap
Wed 3 Oct Halls Gap to Warrnambool via volcanic plains Deakin Uni, Warrnambool
Thu 4 Oct Warrnambool to Anglesea via Great Ocean Rd. YMCA Camp, Anglesea
Fri 5 Oct AM free time; PM You Yangs, Mt Rothwell nocturnal animals. YMCA Camp, Anglesea
Sat 6 Oct Bellarine peninsula, Queenscliff, Mud Island YMCA Camp, Anglesea
Sun 7 Oct Anglesea Heathland YMCA Camp, Anglesea
Mon 8 Oct Depart after breakfast. Travel Anglesea to Tullamarine

Accommodation details

Norval House, Halls Gap: Website: https://uccamping.org.au/norval/

Norval House is a Uniting Church camp 1 km south of the Halls Gap shopping centre. 16 rooms, 6 single beds with pillow and blanket per room, ensuite. We would need to have up to 4 per room. Guests provide own linen other than 1 pillow. Linen hire (sheets, towel and pillow slip) is available, $16 per person. Dining room, lounges and bedrooms in one building, heating and carpets throughout.

Anglesea YMCA Recreation Camp: http://www.camps.ymca.org.au/locate/anglesea.html

Anglesea Recreation Camp is located in a bushland setting on the Great Ocean Road, 400m from Anglesea shopping centre. 28 rooms, 2-6 single beds per room, shared amenties in same building. Need to bring sleeping bag or blankets & sheets, pillow and towel. Linen hire (sheets, pilow and blanket) is available, $16 per person. Dining room accessed via covered walkway.

Deakin University, Warrnambool:

The campus is 5km east of Warrnambool CBD. Accommodation is in multi bedroom units with single, twin and double rooms. Pillows, blankets, bath towel & linen are supplied.

Cost of accommodation and meals will be approx $100 per person per night.

For those wishing to arrange their own accommodation, Hall’s Gap, Warrnambool and Angelsea have a range of accommodation in caravan parks, motels, hotels, cottages, etc. Demand will be high during the second week of Victorian Scholol Holidays so early booking would be advisable. Meals (breakfast, packed lunch and dinner) would be included in ANN Get-together fees for those not staying at the venues (approx $50 per day).

Caravan Parks These caravan parks are the nearest to ANN venues

Halls Gap Caravan Park: Cnr School and Grampians Rd; 1km north of Norval.
ph: 03 5356 4251 www.hallsgapcaravanpark.com.au

Halls Gap Lakeside Tourist Park: Tymna Drive; 3km south of Norval
ph: 03 5356 4281 www.hallsgaplakeside.com.au

Big4 Grampians Parkgate Resort: Grampians Rd; 3km north of Norval.
ph: 03 5356 4215 www.parkgateresort.com.au

Anglesea Beachfront Family Caravan Park: Cameron Rd, Anglesea; 500m from Angelsea Recreation Camp.
ph: 03 5363 1583 www.angleseabeachfront.com.au/

Big4 Hopkins River Holiday Park: Jubilee Park Rd, Warrnambool.
ph: 03 5565 1327 www.hopkinsriver.com.au

Warrnambool Holiday Park: Simson St, Warrnambool.
ph: 03 5562 5031 www.whpark.com.au

If you are likely to attend ANN 2018 please return the attached Expression of Interest form by 31 July 2017. This will ensure that you receive the Circular No 2 which will include more details of costs and programs. This will be sent out early in 2018 and ask people to book in and pay a deposit by March 2018. Final payment will be required by July 2018.

If you have any queries please contact:
John Gregurke email: jgregurke1@bigond.com phone: 0408 353 671
Geraldine Harris email: gedharris49@gmail.com phone: 0407 663 109

Yours naturally,
ANN 2018 SEANA Sub-Committee,

ANN 2018 Expression of Interest Reponse Form

Please return the expression of interest form by 31 July 2017 to
 Geraldine Harris
 mail: gedharris49@gmail.com
post: PO Box 703 Castlemaine VIC 3450

Name: 1. ……………………………………………………………………. Male/Female

2. ……………………………………………………………………………… Male/Female

Address …..…………………………………………………………………….

…..…………………………………………………………………….

Telephone …..…………………………………………………………………….

Mobile (more useful than landline during camp) ………………………………….

Email …..…………………………………………………………………….

Field Naturalist Club …..………………………………………………………….

Travel Arrangements (please circle or underline your preferences)

a. Travelling to Melbourne by air OR b. Travelling to Victoria by car OR c. Towing a Caravan

Require bus transport from Tullamarine Airport to Halls Gap on Saturday 29 September: YES / NO

Require bus transport from Anglesea to Tullamarine Airport on Monday 8 October: YES / NO

Accommodation options

a. Accommodation at ANN venue (includes all meals)

OR b. Will make own accommodation arrangements, meals included ANN fees.

If staying at ANN venues indicate with whom you would like to share a room:

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

If you have any queries please contact:
John Gregurke email: jgregurke1@bigond.com phone: 0408 353 671
Geraldine Harris email: gedharris49@gmail.com phone: 0407 663 109

Thanks for your consideration,

ANN 2018 SEANA Sub-Committee,

Abrolhos Trip

Whale.jpgA group of ANN Field Naturalists 2016, visited “The Abrolhos”. The Abrolhos is sited in a sanctuary and the waters surrounding the islands are protected.  The trip included the history of the Abrolhos – the shipwreck Batavia and the mutineers.  Activities such as snorkelling, fishing, glass bottom boat viewing, visiting islands and rock pooling were included.

Some of the islands are breeding grounds for different bird species such as Lesser & Brown Noddys, Terns, Ospreys, Cormorants and Sea Eagles.  Many birds nest on beaches, be on the lookout for eggs as they are easily trodden on.  Sea Lions were spotted on the islands and close to shore.  Refrain from getting too close to all birds and animals and avoid being between parents and their babies.   Sit or kneel when taking photos so that you are not a threat and you will go home with some great memories.

I indicated that I would love to see a whale close up.  One day, whilst sailing between the islands we had a fantastic encounter with a whale – just beyond the bow that also came up to the side of the boat.  A WOW moment!  Not to be outdone, a pod of dolphins decided to put on a live show surfing, jumping and bumping each other just below the bow and to the stern of the ship.  Whales are rather slow in comparison to surfing dolphins.  Neither are easy to photograph as it is extremely difficult to judge where they will surface and on a boat that is rocking side to side/up and down.  For me, this was the highlight of the trip.

Marilyn

Southern Trip Dossier

Click on the link below to view the latest information and itinerary for the post ANN Southern Tour, 10-16 October 2016.

Dossier Southern Rev 1

Northern Tour Trip Dossier

Click on the link below to view the latest information and itinerary for the pre-ANN Northern Tour, 24-20 September 2016.

Dossier Northern Rev 1

Southwest Australia’s Global Biodiversity Hotspot

 

2016

400th anniversary of the first European Landing in Australia

The Western Australian Naturalists’ Club cordially invites naturalists over Australia to attend the eighth Australian Naturalists’ Network Get-Together to be held at Woodman Point, near Perth, in 2016.

This circular gives;

  • an introduction to the Southwest, (botanical and historical),
  • dates of the ANN2016 and associated tours,
  • details of location, format, accommodation and catering,
  • details of pre and post tours,
  • cost of events and accommodation,
  • enrolment form, and
  • details of timing and payment options.

Introduction to the Southwest

The unique biogeographic region of Southwest Australia, stretching from Shark Bay in the north to Israelite Bay in the south, covers over 300 000 square kilometres and is recognised as an international biodiversity hotspot. https://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/conservation/hotspots. Briefly a Global Biodiversity Hot Spot is one where there are over 1500 endemic plant species and where 70% of the land has been cleared.

The Southwest of Western Australia has over 5710 plant species and some 3000 (52.5%) are endemic. The uniqueness of our flora is the result of growing in an area which has been exposed and uninfluenced by glaciation or volcanism for at least 290 million years, which has been totally isolated by seas and deserts for 30 million years and which has had a drying summer climate for 10-15 million years. Professor Stephen Hopper (UWA and former Director of Kew Gardens, London and Kings Park, Perth) termed it OCBIL – old climate-buffered infertile landscape. This region also has 12 species of mammals, 13 species of bird, 27 reptile species and 28 species of frog that are endemic.

(http://awsassets.wwf.org.au/downloads/wa006_swer_jewel_of_the_australian_continent_1apr06.pdf)

Western Australia also has played a significant part in the European discovery of the Great South Land. http://museum.wa.gov.au/maritimearchaeologydb/maritimereports/findingancientlandillustratedresearchessay.

On the 25th of October 1616, Captain Dirk Hartog arrived on the Dutch East India Company vessel the

Eendracht at Shark Bay. By nailing an inscribed pewter plate to a wooden post at the site now known as Cape Inscription on Dirk Hartog Island, he and his crew made the first recorded European landing on Australian soil – 400 years ago this year. http://museum.wa.gov.au/explore/dirkhartog.

In 1697, after exploring the Swan River and collecting some plants, William de Vlamingh landed at Cape Inscription and removed the original plate and replaced it with one of his own. Hartog’s plate is now housed at the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. Vlamingh’s plate is on display in the Shipwreck Gallery of the WA Maritime Museum in Fremantle. ANN2016 participants will have an opportunity to see the plate during one of the scheduled tours.

Interestingly for botanists, Vlamingh’s collections would have been the earliest from Australia had they survived. Only two specimens were found in Batavia many years later, then incorrectly identified as ferns, and finally correctly named in the early 1800s by Robert Brown (naturalist aboard Mathew Flinders’ Investigator) as Acacia truncata and Synaphea spinulosa from the Swan River area. However in 1699, the British explorer William Dampier also landed at Shark Bay and explored the surrounding area and further north. Dampier was interested in the country and collected and documented many plant and other specimens; 24 plant specimens and documentation survived a ship wreck and now are in the FieldingDruce Herbarium in Oxford– the first scientific collection of plants and other specimens from Australia.

During the Get-Together and the associated tours you will have numerous opportunities to view many of the species that are unique to the Southwest and to visit exhibitions and displays relating to European discovery and exploration as well as learning about the Noongar people, the original inhabitants of the area, and their relationship to the land and sea.

 

 

Tasmanian Field Naturalist Club report

See http://tasfieldnats.weebly.com/uploads/1/7/5/7/17570703/ann_report-dtp.pdf

For photos see https://www.flickr.com/groups/tfnc/pool/tags/2014_Oct_ANN/

Hobart ANN report from Val Hocking

Sunday Mt Wellington visit. On our only cloudy damp day, we ascended Mt Wellington and my bus stopped at The Springs car park where we had a delightful walk to the Spinx Rocks passing bushes of red berries of the Pink Mountain Berry Leptecophyla juniparina and pink and purple berries of the spreading Cheeseberry Cyathodes straminea . There was also lots of white daisy bush and flowering cream Mountain Needlebushes Hakea lissosperma. Many rocks were covered in white and shades of green and grey lichens, adding more beauty in the misty day. Later we drove to the top of the mountain and had to be content to accept the lovely views of Hobart’s waterways from a picture.

Our final talk on Sun night was based around Jelly fish and how large numbers can be a sign of overfishing and other enviromental destruction.

Words of thanks from West Australia Field Nats summed up our great week together and invited us to Perth in Aug/Sept 2016

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Orange myrtle (beech) fungi Cyttaria sp. seen at The Styzx State Park

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Bartailed Godwits seen at Marion Bay. These birds migrated from above the Arctic Circle where they breed

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Spreading Cheeseberry cyanthodes straminea.

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Pink Mountain Berry Leptecophylla juniperina

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Pineapple Candle Heath Richea drachophylla seen half way up Mt Wellington